Combat Basics

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Combat Basics

Post by Red on Thu Nov 27, 2014 1:09 am

Combat Basics
Combat, the subtle dance between two or more people in a free-form setting. A dance which, when well-choreographed, can leave one character pummeled to tiny bits at the feet of another. A dance full of excitement, not to mention a test of one's typing skills and vocabulary all rolled up into one. Unfortunately, one bad sentence can suddenly swing what is supposed to be fun into a frustrating and hostile OOC environment.  We've posted this guide to help you understand IA's fight system so that combat stays fun for everyone.

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Fighting is simple if everyone remembers the golden rule.

Golden Rule: Attacker declares the action; defender declares the result.

That golden rule is the standard in just about any free-form role playing site out there. We at IA think there needs to be a bit of chance added to the system, not just an attacker dictating the whole fight.  Therefore...

Silver Rule: Attacker's dice decide the success or failure of an attack.

When fighting, each player rolls a 100-sided die when they attack or are attacked.  If the attacker's die is higher, the attack succeeds.  If the defender's is higher, the attack fails.

You might think that our silver rule trumps our golden one, but that's not the case. The success or failure of an attack is not the same as its result.  For example, your character could attack with a knife and leave either a papercut or a mortal wound -- both are successful attacks, but one result's a lot stronger than the other.  Which brings us to...

Bronze Rule: The difference between the dice shows the degree of damage.

The more room between your rolls, the more effective the attack.  If Attacker rolls a 99, while Defender rolls a 2, the defender will take a lot of damage.  If Attacker rolls a 55 and Defender rolls a 54, the defender won't take much damage at all.  It's up to the defender to decide exactly how much damage to take, but it's good sportsmanship to take what you're due.

The following are critical numbers:
-- Attacker rolls a 100 .... defender takes a critical hit
-- Defender rolls a 1 .... defender takes a critical hit
-- Attacker rolls a 1 .... the attack may backlash on the attacker (without damaging defender)

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Putting This Into Action
Turns
Combat is divided into turns. The attacker goes, then the defender. Then rolls are reversed.  Here's an example:

Turn 1) Thayne attacks Waspe, aiming the club at her head.
Turn 2) Waspe hisses as the club smacks into her shoulder.

Turn 3) Waspe turns around and tries to sweep kick Thayne.
Turn 4) Thayne jumps up, over her leg, laughing, "Not this time, witch!!"


See how that went? Thayne started the attack and Waspe got to defend.  Then Waspe attacked and Thayne got to defend.


Rolling Against Each Other
To determine success, each fighter rolls a die. For an attack to be successful, the die roll needs to be equal to or over the defender’s roll.

-- If the roll is above the defender’s roll, the attacker may succeed in his move, based on the defender’s choice.
-- If the rolls are equal, then the defender and the attacker both have the option to equal out the attack and move on to another, or they may roll again.
-- If the roll is below the defender’s roll, the defender may block and counter the attacker’s attack.

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Finer Points of Combat
Called Shots
Called shots are not allowed.  For example, you cannot write: "Thayne rushes Malice, kicking her in the face and knocking her into the wall."

That's because Thayne just called the shot -- she took control away from the defender by declaring the outcome.  A better sentence would read:  "Thayne rushes forward, kicking at Malice's face to try and knock her into the wall."

Remember the Golden Rule: Attacker declares the action, defender determines the results!

The rest depends on you, as a player, and the luck presented by the roll of the dice. Just have fun with it!

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A few final words ...

Combat is not all that difficult if you remember our rules. Combat is between characters, not between people. And if you keep it that way, it will remain fun. Sometimes arguments will arise. Try to work them out calmly and rationally. If you still can't find a solution, just walk away and don't get into combat with that person again.
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Re: Combat Basics

Post by TheHatter on Mon Dec 14, 2015 8:59 pm

Dragon's can sometimes be considered a bit OP, along with many other figures here in Sihiri. For that, I have added a system which would take place in all combat against Knight, and perhaps any other time he would use his ability in play. You may also see this system on other player's message boards as well.



You can also find an area for claims in the Character Creation forum.
For each spell like ability, I will add Knight's practice to every dice roll. For example, if Knight should roll for a suggestion spell, and (using a scale of prowess from 1-5) he should roll a 7 out of a d10 dice roll, I would then add 7 to Knight's skill in the use of that spell, which would give Knight an equivalent of 10 in that roll. In the sense of damage, (from a scale of 1 to 3, 1 being nicked, 2 being considerably affected, and 3 being mortally affected or wounded) we would then precede to use the following scale. 1-5 would be unharmed (1), 6-10 would indicate considerable damage (2), and 11-15 would indicate that your character has been mortally wounded. Remember, your character cannot die without your consent. 

The Scale of Prowess, or Practice, is limited to the following:

BASIC - Max 5
Any magical race without training
Untrained/beginner magi (rodis, tenor, clepta)
Kitsune (0-2 tails)
 
ADVANCED - Max 10
Any magical race with basic training
Intermediate/experienced magi (rodis, tenor, clepta, rodis-tenor, rodis-clepta)
Kitsune (3-5 tails)
 
MASTER - Max 15
Master Magi (rodis-tenor-clepta)
Kitsune (6-8 tails)
Faerie officials
 
ELITE - Max 20
Contractors
Elite Magi (rodis-tenor-clepta)
Dragons
Elementals
Kitsune (9-tailed elders)
Faerie leaders
 


Spells can have up to three different effects

At least one weakness is required for every spell.

Below are Knight's Spells and Abilities. I will include examples of the combat requirement listed above so that you can see a jumble of words applied. You do not have to include the parenthesized words in your listing.

(Spell) Suggestion - (Practice) 6
(Description) Knight can influence the effects of a spell, not the caster of the spell itself, by "suggesting" that (1) the spell never occurred, (2) the spell was not intended to harm Knight but another target that Knight would precede to recommend, and (3) the spell is deflected, no matter its existence or who it was intended to harm. He can only use one effect of this spell at a time, and it takes a considerable amount of energy to use more than once in a day.

(Example-does not need to be included)
Cast of effect 2
d10 roll= 7
Prowess =6
Total and damage 7+6=13(3)
The spell is mortally damaged (3) to Knight's favor. Knight would completely avoid the effects of the spell and would be able to deflect it to another person. His opponent should wait a post for this decision to be narrated.


(Spell) Locate Object- (Practice) 4
(Description) Knight can locate an object simply by knowing what it (1) looks like, (2) smells like, or (3) tastes like. The energy that Knight uses to locate the object depends on Knight's physical distance from the object when the spell is caste. If the object is hidden by magical barriers when Knight attempts to find the object, he will be able to obtain the general area containing the object, but he will not know of its exact location.

(Example-does not need to be included in your listing)
Caste of effect 2
d10 roll=5
Prowess=4
Total and damage= 5+4=9(2)
Using effect 2, this spells causes considerable damage (2). Knight can locate the general location of the object.

 
(Ability) Bluff- (Practice) 4
(Description) Knight can bluff his (1) alignment, (2)something (like another imaginary attacker) to distract the opponent, or (3) Knight's intended strategy. As this is a natural ability, it only takes the natural energy exerted.

(Example)
Cast of effect 1
d10 roll=6
Prowess= 4
Total and Damage= 6+4=10(2)
The bluff of Knight's alignment (1) causes considerable damage(2). The opponent would now be convinced that Knight's alignment is not chaotic-evil, but he would be suspicious to it.


(Ability) Jump- (Practice) 4
(Description) Knight can jump, not fly, jump up to thousands of leagues at a time. The roll would determine (1) how far he has jumped.

(Example)
Caste of effect 1
d10 roll=3
Prowess=4
Total and Damage= 3+4=7(2)
Knight's jump causes considerable damage (2). He would have been able to jump several leagues.


(Ability) Appraise- (Practice) 2
(Description) Knight can appraise an object according to its value. The roll would determine (1) how accurately the object is appraised.

(Example)
Caste of effect 1
d10 roll= 9
Prowess= 1
Total and Damage= 9+1=10(2)
The effect of caste 1 is considerably damaged (2). Knight can give a generally accurate appraisal of the object.

 
Without all the mumbo jumbo, the listing would look like this:
Suggestion - 6
Knight can influence the effects of a spell, not the caster of the spell itself, by "suggesting" that (1) the spell never occurred, (2) the spell was not intended to harm Knight but another target that Knight would precede to recommend, and (3) the spell is deflected, no matter its existence or who it was intended to harm. He can only use one effect of this spell at a time, and it takes a considerable amount of energy to use more than once in a day.

 
Locate Object- 4
Knight can locate an object simply by knowing what it (1) looks like, (2) smells like, or (3) tastes like. The energy that Knight uses to locate the object depends on Knight's physical distance from the object when the spell is caste. If the object is hidden by magical barriers when Knight attempts to find the object, he will be able to obtain the general area containing the object, but he will not know of its exact location.

 
Bluff- 4
Knight can bluff his (1) alignment, (2)something (like another imaginary attacker) to distract the opponent, or (3) Knight's intended strategy. As this is a natural ability, it only takes the natural energy exerted.

 
(Ability) Jump- 4
Knight can jump, not fly, jump up to thousands of leagues at a time. The roll would determine (1) how far he has jumped.

 
Appraise- 2
Knight can appraise an object according to its value. The roll would determine (1) how accurately the object is appraised.


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